Keeping ANZAC Day alive in the days of COVID

Updated: Aug 13


Craft projects can be a great way to introduce children to the story of ANZAC Day or further their understanding - here's a quick and easy one for all the whānau, courtesy of the Burnham team.


Whānau have a big part to play in keeping ANZAC Day alive, but sometimes it can be hard to talk with whānau about complex, maybe even scary events, that happened a long time ago.

“Getting that parent involvement for those deeper conversations for children to have as they unpack it at home supports us immensely in sharing ANZAC Day and the meaning behind it,” says Kidsfirst Burnham Head Teacher, Birgit Bracewell. “It’s big stuff - and very thought provoking for young children. The more avenues we have for laying that foundation and developing that understanding, the better.”

It's important to explain history like this in a way that is age appropriate, in line with their own curiosity, and that factors in what they know already.

“We always come back to the child to ask what it is they really want to know,” says Pip Gould. “We don’t assume. As a parent, you need to know what they’re wanting to find out - it might be something very, very simple, but often, as an adult we’ve jumped ahead of them to the next step and taken over what we think it is that they might want to know.”

Craft projects can be a great way to introduce children to the story of ANZAC Day or further their understanding - here's a quick and easy one for all the whānau, courtesy of the Burnham team.









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